One Vinyl Dream
By Jimmie R. Vestal

I pressed a 7" 45 RPM vinyl record.

There is a CD glut! CDs everywhere. Everybody and hisuncle is now recording a CD. I feel that the prestige of this is somewhat diminishing its appeal. It's just something that the music industry expects from us in order to have our songs manufactured, released, distributed, and obtain
airplay on CD-equipped radio stations.

I even have a CD burner, but I decided to promote and release two of my best songs on 7" 45 RPM vinyl. I wanted to try someting different and put a "spark" and some fun back into the songwriting, recording, and releasing aspect.

Vinyl can be distributed to some "record pools". DJs at these pools will take my vinyl into clubs and introduce it to another audience (in addition to radio). Many college radio stations have turntables to spin vinyl, and also some commercial stations, but they are difficult to find.

Why would any artist or band today record only 2 songs on a "45" instead of 10 or more songs on a CD?

**** A vinyl recording is less expensive in studio and manufacturing costs.

**** Vinyl is still being released.
(Examples: LeAnn Rimes, Clint Black, Shania Twain, The Backstreet Boys, Janet Jackson,Trisha Yearwood, Madonna, Mariah Carey, and others.)

**** Many club DJs prefer vinyl.

** The public doesn't have to pay around $12 on up for a CD by a unknown artist (me).

**** Jukebox operators still need vinyl product.

**** Radio stations don't have the time to sort through a CD by an unknown artist on an unknown label to pick out the best song. Even if they hadİthe time, they would probably be sorting through a CD of a well-known artist or band.

I have been conducting a radio market test to see which of my songs WOULD be played by radio stations. The two songs on my 45 RPM pressing are the songs that the stations will play, though not many of them still spin vinyl.

The songs were listed on Atlantic Satellite Marketing's "Buyers Guide and Radio Airplay Chart"

(http://www.goodnet.com/~budahula/promolib.html)

Many might conclude that "No one in the world will play your vinyl release....CDs are the only way to go". Regardless of today's CD technology, I have a small mailing list of radio stations that still spin these antique 45s, and they have agreed to introduce it to their listening audience.

Listen to the song in streaming Real Audio:

http://www.musicwish.com/ra/That'sAllRight.ram


Read two reviews:

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Focus Magazine - Isssue #15, Page 13 - 12/10/98 - St. Petersburg, FL
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http://www.eatmag.com/reviews/locrev1155.html 
========================================================
Robots & Electronic Brains - Cambridge, England
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http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Backstage/1472/vestal.html 

Here is a situation that might develop. What if DJs, at this small group of stations, start receiving phone calls from listeners asking where the CD can be purchased? The stations tells them that it is only available as a vinyl release. They ask a station DJ, "Where can I buy the vinyl copy?".İ The DJ says, "I don't know, try your local music store".

The local music stores receive requests for a vinyl record that they don't stock. A music store employee at Lancelot Music asks, "What radio station didİyou hear the song on?".The customer tells them it was on WTOP. This keeps going on for weeks.

The Lancelot Music store manager calls their main office and asks if they could be shipped a supply
of 100 copies of the vinyl record, "THAT'S ALL RIGHT" by Jimmie R. Vestal.

The main office says, "We don't stock 45s at all, only CDs. Who wants 45s these days?"

The Lancelot manager says, "We keep getting people into the store wanting a song that is only available on vinyl".

The main office checks out a record distributor and asks if they have heard of a certain vinyl rock-blues/rockabilly record called, "THAT'S ALL RIGHT".

Mr. Greenbucks, President of Hit Records Distributorsİsays, "Never heard of it".

The distributor continues to receive requests from other music stores. Mr. Greenbucks keeps hearing that the name of the station playing the record is WTOP. He makes a personal visit to the radio station. To the station manager he says, "I'm Charles Greenbucks of Hit Record Distrbutors in Jackass Flatts. I believe your station has been playing the Jimmie Vestal record".

The station manager answers, "Yes, and we have been getting a lot of requests to play both sides".

"Could I see your copy of the record. for just a minut so I could get an address off of it?İ I want to get the record into the stores instead of waiting for the CD version".

The station manager leaves and returns with a copy and hands it to Mr. Greenbucks.

"I don't see a address anywhere on this record", Mr. Greenbucks proclaims.

"Wait!, looking over the record as he speaks to WTOP's manager, "Here's an E-Mail address - - - Sand and Palms at hotmail dot com". He writes it down, gives the record back, thanks the station manager, and then leaves.

Back at his office, Mr. Greenbucks writes a E-Mail message:

"Sand and Palms Music

Dear Sirs:

"We are interested in purchasing 500 copies of release #SAPR001, "That's All Right", by Jimmie R. Vestal".

- 24 hours later -

Hit Records Distributors calls Lancelot's main office of the music store chain and says that they will be receiving a supply of 45s of the song they wanted. The Lancelot's main office ships 100 vinyl records to the local branch for the customers on the waiting list. A brand new DJ, just recently hired at WHAT, another radio station, learns about the excitement caused by this vinyl record on WTOP.
Since the station only plays CDs, he decides to buy the vinyl record and take it into station.He sneaks in the pro turntable that he uses at a blues club during the weekends.During his first 3 A.M. morning shift at WHAT the listeners hear this:

"This is the Jumpin', and Jivin' Hot Blues Soulman. . . and it's 3 O'clock in the morning time here at WHAT." "We have a first here, Kats! This is the first time we have played a vinyl record here at WHAT since we've switched to the all-CD format 12 years ago."

"I sneaked this turntable into the station for you kids to hear this fantastic number. It's by a brand new
artist on the Sand and Palms record label". "The artist is Jimmie R. Vestal . . . and the song is
"THAT'S ALL RIGHT".

The record spins.

The telephone lines light up!

The DJ is flooded with requests to play the song again and the listeners want to know where they can buy the song.

- - -Then Jimmie R. Vestal wakes up from his dream!

© Jimmie R. Vestal 1999
All Rights Reserved


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